Rising food prices are prompting Iowans to try community gardening

With the warmer weather, more and more people are starting their summer gardens. However, it’s not just the heat that has an increasing number of people testing their green thumbs. Rising grocery prices are pushing more and more Iowans to grow their own food. Without a large-scale farm, community gardens are a nice, affordable alternative. Eat Greater Des Moines found nearly 80 community gardens in the metro. Some are run by the city, others are at the level of schools and churches. The non-profit organization ensures that people struggling with food insecurity have the information they need to access help, such as these gardens. Organizers noticed more people learning about community gardens, especially when the benefits of the pandemic began to wane. how can we still get these products on budget or on time, within the resources we have,” said Mike Armstrong, Eat Greater Des Moines. In West Des Moines, it’s so popular that the Department of Parks and Recreation reports there are 40 people on a waiting list to join. Melanie Perry is a departmental naturalist and teaches people about nature. She says since the pandemic, there’s been an increased interest in getting out and living healthier. Other reasons could include the benefits of the pandemic which has begun to set in. While interest in community gardens is growing, there is not enough land set aside for this type of use in the metro to meet the demand. not in my backyard kind of mentality and something new and big like that. It’s hard to find a perfect location,” Perry said. If you’re looking to learn more about joining a community garden, there’s more information at eatgreaterdesmoines.org.

With the warmer weather, more and more people are starting their summer gardens. However, it’s not just the heat that has an increasing number of people testing their green thumbs. Rising grocery prices are pushing more and more Iowans to grow their own food. Without a large-scale farm, community gardens are a nice, affordable alternative.

Eat Greater Des Moines found nearly 80 community gardens in the metro. Some are run by the city, others are at the level of schools and churches. The non-profit organization ensures that people struggling with food insecurity have the information they need to access help, such as these gardens. Organizers noticed more people learning about community gardens, especially when the benefits of the pandemic began to wane.

“Whenever there’s a shock to the basic needs of a community in terms of increased grocery prices or things like that, people are going to look for other options like how can- we always get these products on budget or on time, within the resources we have,” said Mike Armstrong, Eat Greater Des Moines.

In West Des Moines, it’s so popular that the Department of Parks and Recreation reports there are 40 people on a waiting list to join.

Melanie Perry is a departmental naturalist and teaches people about nature. She says since the pandemic, there’s been an increased interest in getting out and living healthier. Other reasons could include the benefits of the pandemic which has begun to set in. While interest in community gardens is growing, there is not enough land reserved for this type of use in the metro to meet the demand.

“We’re always looking for garden space to expand. It’s a bit difficult though. Sometimes you have that kind of ‘not in my garden’ mentality and something new and big like that. It’s hard to find a perfect location,” Perry said. .

If you’re looking to learn more about joining a community garden, there’s more information at eatgreaterdesmoines.org.

Related: